Posts Tagged ‘Clumber Spaniel’

182 – Love the Breeds: Clumber Spaniel Roundtable | Pure Dog Talk

Love the Breeds: Clumber Spaniel Roundtable

Clumber Spaniel

Clumber Spaniel

Clumber Spaniels are not for everyone, these three breeders say, but for those who love them, they’ll never have another breed. Shedding, snoring and slobbering aside, they agree that the dedication and humor of the Clumber Spaniel is what endears them to their owners.

Jan Sutherland

Jan Sutherland

You can come home from work after having a bad day and you open up the door and here’s this ball of fuzz with a toy in their mouth and their butt’s going everywhere. Not to give you the toy, just to show you the toy,” said breeder-judge Jan Sutherland.

Meeting a Rare Breed

With only an estimated 3,000 dogs in the U.S., the breeders strongly recommend prospective owners go to a national specialty as well as meeting dogs in their home environments, so they can experience “love mauling” in person.

Attend a national specialty before you even make the plunge,” breeder judge Jim Fankhauser said. “Look at the extent of what’s out there before you jump in and make that commitment.”

Excellent Hunting Dogs

A very old flushing spaniel named for Clumber Park in Sherwood Forest in England, the breed was developed to push through low hedges in search of game. They remain a determined, methodical hunting dog that works close to the hunter. Breeder Dr.

Dr. Roe Froman, DVM

Dr. Roe Froman, DVM

Roe Froman, DVM describes them as the “Humvee” of spaniels.

“Find it, flush it, fetch it,” Froman said of the breed’s job. “I love hunting with Clumber Spaniels. I don’t know how many hunt test legs we’ve put on our dogs. Many, many, many for the 20 years we’ve been doing this. It is the most fun I think we can have with our dogs. We love it. They love it. I love it.”

Hunting Clumber

Ch. Sasquatch Chaplin, WDX and Jane (Reeves) Bonaccorso

While a Clumber’s antics are charming, and they are deeply devoted to their people, breeders agree that new owners should be aware of potential health concerns and idiosyncrasies.

Health Issues to Consider

Clumbers are notorious for eating foreign objects. Froman said it is the number one health risk in her experience. The discussion included who had the most foreign body removal surgeries. More than one had stories of dogs opened up six and seven times to take out blankets, socks, rocks, towels, plastic, toys etc.

Potential disease risks include neck and back problems common to long bodied dogs, autoimmune mediated hemolytic anemia and an enzyme deficiency called PDP1.

So, if you’re going to have a Clumber or multiple Clumbers,” Froman said, “pet insurance is a really good thing to think about. they’re worth every penny of it, but they are not an inexpensive breed either. So, don’t think you have to have be rich to have a dog but you have to be responsible. You have to know those things might occur.

Judging the Clumber in the Show Ring

Jim Fankhauser

Jim Fankhauser judging the CSCA National Specialty in 2014.

Clumbers in the show ring have become more successful in recent years, but the unique proportions of the Clumber, described as “long, low and substantial,” can be challenging for conformation judges to asses properly. The standard describes the dog as “9 tall to 11 long measured from the withers to the base of the tail.” This is a much longer dog than most judges are accustomed to seeing.

It’s the training, in a sense, of a lot of the new judges that are coming into the breed,” said Fankhauser, “because they see rectangular, but it’s rectangular from, as Laura mentioned before, point of shoulder to buttocks. It’s not rectangular as we measure. So, you have to get them to retrain their eye to long enough.You’re never going to find one too long.”

We hope you enjoy today’s podcast sharing the love of a special breed. You can find more information at http://www.clumbers.org/

 

179 — Non Profit Foundations Benefit our Breeds | Pure Dog Talk

Non Profit Foundations Benefit our Breeds

The Clumber Spaniel Health Foundation, created by members of the Clumber Spaniel Club of America, is a non profit organization dedicated to raising funds for health research in their beloved breed. A low registration breed with a relatively small gene pool, the breeders were making progress on the breed’s health issues, but wanted to do more.

It Is Our Responsibility to Act

“While there is no doubt our breed has come a long way in the last 25 years,” CSHF President Jen Amundsen notes on the organization’s web site, “health issues such as immune mediated hemolytic anemia, disc disease, cardiomyopathy and hemangiosarcoma are taking many of our Clumbers much too early in life. It is our responsibility to act.”

Dr. Roe Froman, DVM referenced the Margaret Mead quote, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has” as her rallying cry in creating the group that formed the Foundation.

This group has, in fact, changed their world. The CSCA, with a membership of roughly 300, has raised over $100,000 for the Foundation in the last 10 years. The DNA bank Froman created also helped identify gene markers and DNA testing for PDP1, a very specific neurological disease, that is now virtually eliminated in the breed.

CSHF pools its resources through the AKC’s Canine Health Foundation, Morris Animal Foundation and others, to support research being done on diseases of specific importance to the Clumber Spaniel.

Amundsen, an attorney who specializes in work that affects dog owners, provides an excellent tutorial in this episode about the actual how and why of creating a 501c3 non-profit organization for dog clubs. Groups seeking non-profit status for fundraising on health research, rescue, education or any similar venture, will value her suggestions.

While some of the more populous breeds’ parent clubs have already created Foundations to address some of these topics, Amundsen and Froman give hope, encouragement and direction to members of smaller clubs for ways in which they can create a positive impact for their breeds

Don’t miss Allison Foley’s Tip of the Week from the Leading Edge Dog Show Academy on flying with your dog in cabin and how to get through airport screening safely and easily with your pet in a carry-on bag.

LINKS:

  • http://www.clumberhealth.org
  • https://www.facebook.com/dogsavvylawyer/
  • http://leadingedge-dog-show-academy.teachable.com/courses